Review

An innocent village GIRL, on the eve of her marriage, finds her whole secure life shattered by an unexpected event. She finds herself far from home, facing an alien, predatory world, with no experience to deal with it. Only through good fortune, after a brutalising experience, a reluctant stranger befriends her. He is a Transvestite, a wise, witty character on a journey of his own. He’s an entertainer, earning a living from his performances in villages and on the roadside. She forces him to help her get home. In order to ensure she makes the journey safely and without further harm befalling her, he disguises her as a Man.
And so they start together on the road: the GIRL now acting the man, the MAN now a woman, on a journey, which neither knows where, or how it will end. Like a ‘LA STRADA’ this is the dramatic story of two people travelling along an endless road, all alone, beyond the boundary of ordinary society, outcasts, slowly coming to terms with each other and the world around them. He teaches her his craft and together they entertain the passing parade of people they come across. The film is also filled with the humour of their many experiences.

At the same, for the GIRL this is a journey of discovering the freedom of being a man in a male chauvinistic Indian society. Her suppressed spirit soars. She no longer has to behave as the servile, traditional woman. But they can’t deny their destinies of being a woman and a man who have gradually fallen in love with each other. And so towards the end of their journey they revert to their sexual identities to fulfil this love. But a journey once begun can never end. Nor can the traveller return to be the person she/he once was. Her past won’t accept her and her future is now irrevocably intertwined with her lover, come what may.