Review

I was a contented, elderly man, not looking to be immersed in any emotional cauldrons . . . and then, unexpectedly, Bhima came along, skewering all my calculations.
On a hot June evening, Timeri Murari returns home from a game of tennis to find a baby lying on his bed and watching him through beautiful, large, bewildered eyes. ‘He’ll be here a few days,’ his wife, Maureen, tells him. ‘When he’s well, he’ll go back to the orphanage.’ Having played host to other young orphaned house guests before, Tim assumes that once the wound from his recent nine –hour surgery has healed, Bhima will do the same.
But Bhima brings much more to their lives than Tim and Maureen have bargained for. With the unquestioning faith of a child, he surrenders himself to their care, and with his quiet resilience in the face of excruciating physical pain, his mischievous pranks and unusual intelligence, he takes complete possession of their hearts. Before long, Tim, who has never been comfortable with children, finds himself busy learning to be a father and loving every moment.
However, their idyll is short-lived, for Bhima’s destiny lies elsewhere. His adoptive parents are about to arrive in India to meet him, and Tim and Maureen have to confront the harsh reality of handing him over to them. They are tormented by guilt and the agonising doubts about their own decision for Bhima’s future.
An intensely moving account of the unforgettable year that changed Tim Murari’s life, My Temporary Son is as much a guide through the convoluted corridors of the adoption process in India as it is an insider’s account of the emotional turmoil that necessarily accompany every case of adoption. It is, equally, an inspiring tribute to the countless people, in our country and abroad, who have it in their hearts to love and nurture children who have been abandoned by those closest to them.

India - Penguin